THE COLLECTION

Counting the votes

© Annette Egerton. All Rights Reserved, 2020 / Hall For Cornwall

Counting the votes

Made: 1983

Record Number: HFC:2019:11

A candid photo capturing the energy and buzz of activity during the election count held inside City Hall.

Object Dimensions: 15 X 10

Object Type: digital image

Method - scan Date - 2019

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